The Definition of Alternative Medicine

Have you ever suffered from a horrible headache when you thought the best remedy might be for someone to bash you over the head, or to pull your hair out? Then you might have some experience with alternative medicine!

In all seriousness, alternative medicine is not about hurting yourself, but involves investigating other potential methods to treat an ailment besides synthetic drugs. A good purpose for alternative medicine is to avoid developing a dependence on drugs of any type, which can supersede any medicinal or curing effects they might have. Searching for different ways of dealing with your physical or emotional issues or conditions can end up being better for you in the long run.

A great deal of alternative medicine treatments come from ancient medicinal knowledge and insight. Many different types of remedies used by different cultures through the years, including the use of needles for pain relief, herbs for medicinal treatments, or even massage therapy, are considered a form of medicine by the respective users because they work to some degree. However, many alternative treatments are unknown to the general public, as they are not in conformity with the mass marketed treatments and pharmaceuticals.
The definition of alternative medicine

There is really no one ultimate definition of alternative medicine. There are so many various methods and treatments that have been and continue to be investigated and promoted that it is hard to firmly define it.

Some of these alternative names to alternative medicine include holistic medicine, natural medicine, integrated medicine, and complementary medicine. They are all variations of the same idea, which is natural and alternative medicine. The design of alternative medicine is to ensure that all parts of a person’s life and being are well and strong.
The point of view of the alternative medicine collective

A standard of those who advocate alternative medicine is that health isn’t only the absence of illness or disease. Alternative medicine works to ensure that one’s purpose in life is sustained, because a person without a purpose is not able to achieve his fullest potential. There needs to be inspiration and motivation to allow life to be lived to its fullest.

It is thought that illness might not be the end of one’s world. Infection is not the only cause of sickness. The mind has the power to change one’s personality completely. Take the great warrior king Asoka, for example. He was so stirred by the death and devastation brought about by the Kalinga war that he became a Buddhist reformer. In this respect, illness has the capacity to bring about change, to make us better human beings. For that reason, alternative medicine strives to consider not only the physical health of a person, but also his personality and emotions in treating ailments and bringing about total well-being.

Sometimes, when you aren’t feeling that great, it might be better to relax by listening to calming music, taking a walk, or just thinking about life, rather than taking a pill to treat something momentarily. Discovering your purpose will give you a feeling of strength and the realization that life is worth living!

Yoga: How To Develop A Home Practice

Many people ask how to start a home yoga practice so here is some information to get you going. First I will review the basics and then discuss how often to practice and what to practice. Remember though, the only right practice is regular practice! Don’t let your desire for perfectionism get in your way. Just show up at your mat and practice. Yoga is a life-long journey – perhaps many lives!

Environment

The space should be quiet, and ideally used only for yoga. (Can be a section of any room)
Place a mat, blanket or towel on the floor.
The temperature should be moderate – not too cold and not too hot.
The room should have fresh air but not windy or cold.
Sunrise and sundown are desirable times for yoga (although any time works!)

Preparation

Wear light comfortable clothing.
A bath or shower before is good for limberness -wait at least 20 minutes after
practicing before bathing)
In the morning wash, urinate and move the bowels before practice.
Practice before eating or wait two hours after a meal.

Physical Practice (asanas)

Do not practice if there is a fever or deep wounds. Consult a teacher if there is an illness.
Spend five to ten minutes warming up/stretching before beginning practice.

Do not force your limbs into a difficult position. In time your body will open. We are after sensation not pain!

Beginners should hold each asana for 3-5 breaths. After about three months of regular practice this can be increased to 5 to 10 breaths.

Always inhale and exhale through the nostrils unless specified otherwise. Focus on making the breath slow and smooth.

At any time you need a rest come into child pose or shavasana (corpse pose)
Finish asanas with shavasana for five to ten minutes.

How often to practice.

The rule of thumb for how often to practice is simple: It is better to practice for short durations regularly than to practice once a week for a long time. In other words it is better to practice 4 times a week for forty-five minutes then to practice one day for two hours.

With that being said some people get what they need from practicing just a couple of times each week while other practice five or six times a week. It varies from person to person. On average though you will get the most benefit from your practice with average of four sessions per week. The length of time of each session depends on your experience with yoga, time constraints, level of fitness, and motivation. A good idea is to have a journal to keep track of your practice with information such as date, how long you practiced, what you practiced, how you felt during and after your practice, what thoughts came to mind during practice, how you felt later in the day as well as the next day, which postures were challenging and which were felt good.
General framework for your session

Always begin your practice with easy movements and build towards the more difficult postures ending with a cool down. Imagine a bell curve: at the beginning of the bell curve is a moment of centering. As you move up the curve there are warm-ups, then opening postures which help to build heat/ flexibility/strength and at the top of the curve are the most challenging postures. Moving down the other side of the bell curve are cool down postures followed by Shavasana.

Here is a template that you can use to create your own practice session:

Theme or focus (more on this below):

Centering:
Warm-ups:
Opening postures
Challenging postures:
Cool down postures:
Shavasana:

Which postures to practice.

Sometimes it is fun to have a practice without any preconceived notion of what to do and just see what comes out. Sometime it is desirable to tune into your body and see what your body is asking for. Other times you’ll want to plan your session as indicated above. It is during these session that having theme will be helpful. Some classical themes include: backbends, forward bends, twists, balance postures, standing postures, seated postures, inversions, restorative postures, hip openers, shoulder openers, strength building postures, groin openers, hamstring openers, and postures that build energy. Linking postures together (vinyasa) is yet another way to create a practice. In the Iyengar system we focus on linking alignment cues from posture to posture. Of course you may have specific health reasons that you are working with for which it would be best to consult a qualified yoga teacher to help create a practice. I encourage you to be creative – come up with your own themes and see how it is. It has been said that in yoga you are both the scientist and the experiment!

In my book “Beginning Yoga: A Practice Manual” I offer 20 different practice sequences to guide your home practice as well as a chapter on how to set up a home practice.

How to Improve Memory And Concentration : Ginko Biloba

Ginko Biloba
Ginkgo Biloba is one of the oldest living tree species, dating back over 300 million years. Individual trees can live for over 1,000 years. Ginkgo Biliboa is the best selling herbal product in the world. It is an extract from the green leaves of the Ginkgo tree which is native to Asia, however, is grown worldwide.

The active ingredients in the extract are the Ginkgoflavoneglycos, Bilobalide, and terpenelactones including ginkgolides A, B and C. In Asia, ginkgo tree extracts have been used for over 5,000 years to treat cardiovascular problems as well as lung disorders.

Ginkgo’s most powerful effect is on the circulating system. Ginkgo flavenoids directly dilate the smallest segment of the circulating system, the micro-capillaries, which increase both blood circulation and oxygen levels in the brain as well as in other critical organ tissues. Ginkgo also prevents platelet aggregation or clumping inside the arterial walls. This increases arterial wall strength and flexibility and decreases the opportunity for the formation of arteriosclerostic plague. Since ginkgo increases oxygen flow to the brain and enhances the brains uptake and utilization of glucose it also is being researched for its role in the senility, forgetfulness, headaches and Alzheimer’s disease and its role in improving alertness, memory and mental performance. Recent studies indicate that some patients exhibiting the symptoms of these ailments enjoyed marginal improvement in cognitive abilities after using Ginko. In addition to the benefits provided to the brain by Ginko, it has been shown that Ginko can also help reduce the frequency and intensity of depression.

Related to circulatory improvement, German researchers have also been studying ginkgo as a treatment for atheroclerotic peripheral vascular disease. This disease impairs walking and ginkgo has been shown to help blood flow to the legs allowing people to walk further with far less pain. Ginkgo is a highly important antioxidant shown to have a special affinity for scavenging the superoxide radicals.

Benefits  Ginkgo Biloba
• Increases circulation to the brain and lower extremities
• Treats senile conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease
• Treats loss of concentration and emotional fatigue in the elderly
• Treats hardening of the arteries
• Treats depression
• Treats allergies
• May treat tinnitus and vertigo
• May reduce vision loss due to aging
• May reduce symptoms associated with Raynaud’s disease
• Possible assistance in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease.

1 2 3